Posts Tagged ‘Eco Shrimping Tour’


Corinthian Catamarans: ARC Excursion Vessels

Wednesday, July 20th, 2016

by: Davis Yancy Clegg

 

Amelia River Cruises Bald Eagle

Bald Eagle

 

Looking inward somewhat, I thought it would be cool to share with you guys, especially boating enthusiast, just what kind of experience you can come to appreciate with cruising Amelia River Cruises. Along with a compassionate and professional Staff, the best Captains and live music around, and a great view, we take pride in the vessels that take so wonderful care in helping our guests get the most out of a cruise. We use two boats for all different types of cruises. Whether it is a Shrimping Eco tour, BYOB tour, or your very own private charter, all your excursions with us will be enjoyed on one of our spacious Corinthian Catamarans!

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Environmental Interest Groups Make This Paradise

Wednesday, June 1st, 2016

Sea Turtle Nest Warning

 

Once you’ve been on your first river tour with us, you will quickly come to understand why we take such pride our little stretch of history. But with every attraction, there is also an inherent responsibility to protect it for years to come. Groups around the region with specific environmental interests are what keep the scenery in frame. Turtle watch groups help preserve hatchlings and their chances at life. Their efforts are responsible for the survival many endangered species. Sea turtle nests – protected by staked off perimeters -mean survival for some of the millions hatchlings that are lost to predators and accidental disturbances. The Wildlife Rescue Coalition of Northeast Florida is such a group. Experts in their fields, veterinarians, rehabilitators and other specialists came together under one common idea. The majority agreed that little or no care was being given in an appropriate manner to injured wildlife in the region. In the beginning stages, the WRCNEF was limited in its range of operation. Since it’s operations began in 2003, they have come to serve Baker, Clay, Duval, Nassau, Flagler, Putnam, and St. Johns counties. They have achieved such success while keeping WRCNEF an entirely volunteer-based organization. They receive zero funding from any level of government.

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Curious Gentle Sea Cows

Wednesday, May 18th, 2016

by: Davis Yancy Clegg

Manatee

 

Perhaps, the most rewarding aspect of being on Amelia Island is the wildlife. The island is blessed to have such an array of species located in such close proximity to – if not on – the island. Everyone loves to see the wild horses out on Cumberland Island. They have a certain poise about them that sets them apart. The Egrets and exotic species of birds always make for a nice afternoon tracking birds. There is one friend that often pops up to say hello at the marina that always seems to trump the others. Every once in a while, a manatee will make an afternoon appearance down where the charter boats are tied up.

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The Coming Tide

Thursday, August 13th, 2015

by: Davis Yancy Clegg

 

Sunset on Amelia Island

 

 

The human condition has always been a burden on the “pursuit of happiness” that we were all promised centuries ago by our beloved predecessors. That pursuit – as we all are very well aware of – comes at a price. Unfortunately, the price I speak of isn’t one even the wealthiest of us can escape. Though it isn’t tangible, it’s felt all over the body. It comes in many degrees and circumstances that sometimes leave us in nothing less than awe. If we must put it to one word, let’s call it “stress.”

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Conserving the Current: The Year of the River

Thursday, June 4th, 2015

by: Davis Yancy Clegg

St Johns River

St Johns River – Jacksonville FL

The concept of a community – from our perception -can be diluted to where we only perceive it as our immediate surroundings. While maintaining a beautiful lawn to keep the homeowners association in your favor is a noble pursuit, conditions exist outside of our own backyards that require our collective efforts to preserve the environmental stability on a much larger scale. The St. Johns River is of said scale. Jacksonville’s Mayor Alvin Brown, the Cummer Museum and the St. Johns Riverkeeper came together to collaborate a year round awareness campaign to help preserve the St. Johns River economic viability. Together, they announced that 2015 shall be dubbed “The Year of the River.” The St. Johns River has such an enormously impact on the city’s economy that goes unnoticed by many (if not the local majority). The goal is to recruit upwards of 50 institutions to raise awareness of the vast economic impact the river provides. “The celebration of the Year of the River is all about valuing the St. Johns River, and the first step to protect our mighty river is having that strong sense of responsibility and value and care for the St. Johns,” St. Johns Riverkeeper Lisa Rinaman said. “By us getting together to celebrate the Year of the River it really gives us an opportunity to give something back to our river, because it’s really shaped us as a community, and it’s part of our being. It’s part of us celebrating and valuing our great river.”

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Save A Light & Save A Life

Monday, September 15th, 2014

by: Davis Yancy Clegg

 

Loggerhead Turtle on Amelia Island

Green Sea Turtle

 

Living on the palm tree laden Amelia Island, we are fortunate enough to be a host to a wide array of marine life. When strolling along our beaches in the summer months, you may come across areas marked with wooden stakes and yellow tape.  When I first came to the Island from northern Mississippi a lifetime ago, you can imagine I was understandably befuddled by such a sight.  Don’t fret! This is no crime scene. Yet, a scene of new and endangered life our locals are diligent in protecting.

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Taste the Best Shrimp and Support the Local Shrimping Industry

Monday, April 28th, 2014

by: Kacie Couch

islandGirl

The local shrimping boat “Island Girl” at sunset.

The Importance of EATING LOCAL

Have you ever bought a bag of prepackaged frozen shrimp at the grocery store? Did you ever check the label and looked at the ingredients listed on the back? I know what you’re thinking. You’re thinking “There aren’t any additional ingredients in shrimp besides shrimp.” But you may be wrong. Check it out, there is an ingredient called sodium tripolyphosphate. Would you want to eat or feed that to your family? Neither would I.

With so many fish and other seafood’s being farmed in third world countries it’s not just our local shrimping economy that is hurting; it’s our bodies as well. Diabetes and obesity are two major health issues affecting the United States and there is no question why; preservatives and chemicals have dominated our diets in recent years. So why are we continuing to fill our bodies with these chemicals when we’re surrounded by the best seafood in the world, just offshore Florida? In most cases, simply because it’s cheaper… But trust me, we will be paying much more for these decisions in the long run.

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An Incredibly Brief History of the Shrimping Industry

Wednesday, August 21st, 2013

Written by: Kacie Couch

 

Well ladies and gentlemen; it’s that time of year. The kids are back in school (much to the relief of many parents) and this season’s Eco Tours winding down! That being said, I feel it is only fitting to write this week’s blog as a tribute to the animal that started it all: the shrimp.

Shrimp on Amelia Island

This one was captured and then released on one of our Eco Tours

As Captain Kevin likes to say, “We invented shrimp on Amelia Island. Well, maybe not. But we did invent the modern day shrimping industry!” And this is very true. The most important invention in shrimping history happened in 1913 on Amelia Island when a fisherman named Billy Corkum came down from Gloucester, Massachusetts on the hunt for blue fish. By a stroke of good luck, Billy ended up visiting some friends on Amelia Island during his journey, and it was here that he watched the process of shrimping for the very first time. Before Mr. Corkum, shrimpers had been using saine nets hung between two boats to catch shrimp. Billy devised a better way. He invented the otter trawl net, the net used by all shrimp boats (and our boat) today. Since the day Billy came to town the shrimping industry has never been the same. People up and down the eastern coast (who had never tried shrimp before) got a taste of the sweet Fernandina shrimp and wanted more! Today, shrimp is the number one seafood consumed in the United States and for a long time Amelia Island remained the capital of this industry. Unfortunately, shrimping has declined on Amelia Island, yet the demand for shrimp keeps growing, and the nets and shrimping processes keep evolving.

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Celebrating Shark Week 2013…. Yes, we see these too on the Amelia River Cruises!

Saturday, August 10th, 2013

Article by: Kacie Couch

 

It’s Discovery Channel’s infamous “Shark Week 2013” this week! And you know what that means here on the Eco Tour at Amelia River Cruises and Charters: “We’re gonna need a bigger boat.”

Just kidding! While we do catch sharks in our otter trawl net from time to time, they are almost always under 2 feet in length and not nearly as dangerous as the twenty-something foot great white shark portrayed in the movie JAWS.

Great White Shark

Great White Shark off Florida

Seen at the Intracoastal North Florida

Hmmm

However; just because we don’t catch large sharks where we trawl does not mean that we do not have large and dangerous sharks in our area. In recent studies, it has been found that great whites do visit the outer banks of Amelia Island! In fact, if you come on the Eco-Tour you might just be lucky enough to hear our resident marine biologist Justina tell you the story of what exactly happened when she was aboard the OCEARCH vessel that caught and tagged Lydia, a 13 foot great white (who weighed over 2,000 pounds, no less), about a mile off the Jacksonville coast. Lydia was three feet shorter in length than Mary Lee, the notorious 16 foot great white (weighing 3,500 pounds) who wandered into the Jacksonville Beach breakers earlier this summer. No one really knows why these sharks are down here, but theories have been thrown around recently indicating that they may be following the migration of the Right Whales or that these sharks may travel to northeast Florida to give birth. (more…)

The American White Pelican Likes to Visit Amelia Island Too!

Wednesday, July 31st, 2013

Article by: Kacie Couch

 

White Pelicans around Amelia Island

White Pelicans on Amelia Island, FL

A-well-a, bird, bird, bird, well, the bird was the word today on the Eco Tour here at Amelia River Cruises and Charters! We have been seeing more birds during low tide lately than we can count but today I’m going to focus on a particular type of bird that has piqued our interest this season: the American white pelican.

Why are we so interested in this bird? Well allow me to explain: White pelicans are a migratory species, just like geese or any of our local “snow birds” (including my grandparents- Hi guys!) but for whatever reason, a flock of these delightful birds have decided to forgo their usual migratory pattern and spend the summer here on Amelia Island with us. Perhaps they’ve grown too old to travel; or perhaps they just decided to spend some extra time in paradise this year. Whatever the reason may be, the white pelicans are here, and we’re certainly enjoying their company because these birds are INCREDIBLE.
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