Tiger Sharks; the Latest Entry on the Endangered Species List

Wednesday, September 28th, 2016

by: Davis Yancy Clegg

Tiger Shark

 

This week’s shark adventure takes us to one of the most sought after species of shark in the world. Second in numbers only to everyone’s favorite fear-fish, the Great White, these predators are the oceans perfect trigger for fear. They eat literally, anything. They most do plenty of it too, because these massive creatures have been seen growing to lengths of 16 feet and more. This particular eating habit has dubbed the tiger shark as being an apex predator (literally meaning they attack and eat anything that brings their appetite to the forefront of their oceanic agenda. You may think of a shark’s diet being primarily composed of typical predator-doomed and defenseless fish. In this instance, you will find that the tiger sharks’ tastes are broader, for lack of a more accurate descriptor. This species of shark – like many grey sharks – is found in the moderately temperate and tropical coastal regions. They have also been known to patrol the oceans surrounding Hawaii, Tahiti, Solomon and the Marshall Islands.

Sure, we all have enough respect for sharks and the stories they’ve inspired over time. But, do we really give their phenomenal strength the due diligence in educating students regarding their aggressively effective methods for seizing prey. As for their prey, autopsy-after-autopsy shows that these apex predators have far more than a little mercury from fish in their digestive system. Recently, tiger sharks have been opened up, and the discoveries made by scientist are nothing short of jaw-dropping. Their stomach contents have been known to house the remains of snakes, birds, goats, and even horses. Horses! In fact, tiger sharks care so little about the “foods” they choose to eat, even inedible items have been part of their diet. These items include little league bats, baseballs, license plates, tires, and a variety of sorted plastic goods. Much of their confidence displayed in their aggressive feeding behaviors can be attributed to their incredibly strong jaws. Powerful enough to crack the nearly indestructible shells of sea turtles and clams, these sharks are not to be trifled with! Unfortunately, fishermen heed no such warning. Tiger sharks are relentlessly hunted as a result of the market values placed on their skin, teeth, fins and livers which contain the world’s greatest known concentrations of Vitamin A. Yes, as the saying goes, they are very many fish in the see. However, with over 100 million of these natural wonders being killed for profit every single year, we’ve lost over a billion sharks to commercial fishing and bycatch in only the past 10 years. Not only has this pursuit of flesh resulted in tiger sharks being one of the latest entries on the endangered species list, current practices will directly be responsible for bringing on the extinction of one of the oceans most beautiful apex species.

Tiger Shark PupThe tiger shark is considered to be sacred by some native Hawaiians, who think their eyeballs have special seeing powers. Legend suggests that many kings living is historical Hawaiian environment acquired their future decisions by consuming the eye of the Tiger shark. It is said that the mother of the most famous king of Hawaii, King Kamehameha asked for the eyes of the Tiger shark during her pregnancy because they wanted to enhance the leadership qualities of the future king she carried. What’s sacred to some is simply supper and expensive hand cream to others. It’s the world we live in now. If we can’t put an end to, or find an alternative solution to the population decline that’s perpetually worsening, we better find a new planet to continue our existence once our actions render the Earth incapable of sustaining animal and human life. Be Aware. Seek out the knowledge that helps you to become active and back up your environmental views!

 

We don’t have many shark seeings around here but we do  have the best sunsets.
Join us for a relaxing Family friendly Sunset Cruise!

 

 

 

 

 

The Great White Shark – King of the Deep

Wednesday, September 21st, 2016

by: Davis Yancy Clegg

 

Great White Shark

 

 

This week, we are going to take a look into to what is maybe the most popular predator of all time. It’s exploits on both the silver screen and in real life events have put it into a category that almost transcends the universal species label of “shark.” No, this swimming set of teeth would be more aptly named the King of the Deep. Fear mongering and widely believed fiction-based storytelling have turned the beautifully scary oceanic icon into a decidedly calculating man-eater. In truth, the reality of the situation is that these monstrously large predators very rare approach – much less attack – human. Even when the occasional great white attacks take place, they are a far cry from always ending in a fatal blow. While most are under the impression the Great White is the absolute top of the food chain, they would be remised to believe -unequivocally – that the buck stops with the Great Whites. As history has taught us in studying and living out the grinds in all facets of plant, animal and human life, there is always a threat to your position in both your work and personal life.

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Hammerhead Shark Facts and Information

Wednesday, September 14th, 2016

by: Davis Yancy Clegg

 

Hammerhead Shark

 

One common statement you will hear among those unfamiliar with any number of shark species is, “I can’t tell the difference.” Well, when it comes to identifying our next shark on the break, its’ frequent spells of laying in the shallows just off the shoreline have people everywhere savvy on what a hammerhead shark appears like. Quite obviously, their species name is derived from their hammer-shaped head. This tool-shaped head is also known – scientifically – as a cephalofoil.

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Sharktember Fest at Amelia River Cruises

Wednesday, September 7th, 2016

by: Davis Yancy Clegg

 

Blacktip Shark

 

Welcome to our first annual “Shark-tember.” This will be our first month-long look into a single animal and the different species which fall under its’ class. If you are like me and pay entirely too close attention to social media, you may have seen that there have been a few shark appearances right off the beaches of Amelia Island. The first swimming set of teeth we are going to explore is the blacktip shark. Now, this species often gets confused with a reef shark that goes by the same name. The blacktip shark is a species of requiem shark. What is a requiem shark you ask? Simply put, they are migratory sharks that flock to the warmest part of the seas they can sense out. Spinner sharks and some of their relatives of close origins also fall under the requiem category. It’s becoming a widely embraced speculation and a resolve-ridden belief is growing that requiem came from the French word requin, which also has some ambiguity as to its’ definitive meaning. One Latin translation of the words Latin equivalent simply means “rest.” Given this species is one of many with some very serious migratory habits, their name translating as “rest” seems in conflict with the interests of the shark’s daily grind in the deep.

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Why Is The Roseate Spoonbill Pink

Wednesday, August 24th, 2016

by: Davis Yancy Clegg

 

Roseate Spoonbill

 

Roseate Spoonbills are part of the avian Order Ciconiiformes along with herons, bitterns, storks, ibises, and flamingoes. As members of the family Threskiornithidae, they share family traits with the ibises. Roseate are one of six genera of spoonbills found worldwide and the only one native to the Western Hemisphere. In the United States they are typically found along the coastal areas of the Southeast (primarily along the coasts of Florida, Louisiana, and Texas). They can be found in mangrove swamps, tidal ponds, and saltwater lagoons or other sources of brackish water.

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Florida Manatee Sightings

Wednesday, August 17th, 2016

by: Davis Yancy Clegg

Fernandina Beach Harbor Front

Florida Manatees like to hang out at the Fernandina Harbor Front

 

The Florida manatee has taken on the title of Florida’s state marine mammal. A manatee is very large aquatic relative of the elephant. They are grayish brown in color and have very thick, wrinkled skin. There is often a growth of Algae on their skin. They have two flippers in front and one flat flipper in back. The front flippers help the mammal to navigate through shallow waters. Their powerful flat tail helps to propel them through the water. While the Florida manatee’s eyes are very tiny, and its’ ears are not visible, it is thought to see and hear better than most! Manatees are sometimes called sea cows, and their languid pace lends merit to the comparison. However, despite their massive bulk, they are graceful swimmers in coastal waters and rivers. Powering themselves with their strong tails, manatees typically glide along at 5 miles (8 kilometers) an hour but can swim 15 miles (24 kilometers) an hour in short bursts. Manatees are usually seen alone, in pairs, or in small groups of a half dozen animals. From above the water’s surface, the animal’s nose and nostrils are often the only thing visible. Manatees never leave the water but, like all marine mammals, they must breathe air at the surface. A resting manatee can remain submerged for up to 15 minutes, but while swimming, it must surface every three or four minutes.

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Mosquite-borne virus Zika surfaced in South Florida

Wednesday, August 10th, 2016

by: Davis Yancy Clegg

 

Mosquito

 

First discovered in Ugandan in 1947, the Zika virus has surfaced right here in Florida. There is currently a neighborhood in Miami where it has been confirmed that mosquitoes are spreading the virus. Zika virus disease is caused by the Ziska virus, which is spread to people primarily through the bite of an infected mosquito (Aides Aegyptus and Aides albolite’s). The illness is usually mild with symptoms lasting up to a week, and many people do not have symptoms or will have only mild symptoms. However, Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause a serious birth defect called microcephaly and other severe brain defects. Zika is spread to people primarily through the bite of an infected Aides species mosquito (Aides Aegyptus and Aides albolite’s). A pregnant woman can pass Ziska to her fetus during pregnancy or around the time of birth. Also, a man with Zika can pass it to sex partners.

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Amelia Island is a Community of Solidarity and Loyalty

Wednesday, August 3rd, 2016

by: Davis Yancy Clegg

 

Historic Fernandina Beach at Sunset

Historic Fernandina Beach at Sunset

 

Showing no signs of cessation, Silicon Valley sits perched atop the tech industry, unrivaled and always eager to serve up a touch more convenience to take another edge off our daily grind. Whether you’re pressed to whip out a last minute phrase in Spanish, trying to remember the name of a song, or need to download a level on the jobsite, someone has likely programmed an app which awaits your eager click. Uber, originally taking to the streets in 2009, was introduced in the San Francisco Bay area as Ubercab. In true grass roots fashion, the small startup capitalized on their locally-realized potential. In just a few short years, 2009 brought the unchallenged new company international success. As of May 2016, Uber was becoming a global in all operations, providing its’ services and transportation in 66 countries and 449 cities. Adversely, next time you are in need of a lift, take a look at how many Uber drivers are available in Fernandina Beach on any given night. No, there’s not an issue with your data plan. You’re experiencing what many tourists will experience throughout the season. Individuals seeking to compete with well-established taxi services are having a difficult time getting their foot in the economic door. While big cities are a virtual money pit for an Uber driver partner, smaller towns are proving to be a far less effortless economy to penetrate. These local businesses have earned the loyalty of their tightly-knit communities and have most or all their personal worth invested in their business.

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Corinthian Catamarans: ARC Excursion Vessels

Wednesday, July 20th, 2016

by: Davis Yancy Clegg

 

Amelia River Cruises Bald Eagle

Bald Eagle

 

Looking inward somewhat, I thought it would be cool to share with you guys, especially boating enthusiast, just what kind of experience you can come to appreciate with cruising Amelia River Cruises. Along with a compassionate and professional Staff, the best Captains and live music around, and a great view, we take pride in the vessels that take so wonderful care in helping our guests get the most out of a cruise. We use two boats for all different types of cruises. Whether it is a Shrimping Eco tour, BYOB tour, or your very own private charter, all your excursions with us will be enjoyed on one of our spacious Corinthian Catamarans!

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A Bright Idea: Modern Lighthouses

Wednesday, July 13th, 2016

by: Davis Yancy Clegg

The Amelia Island Lighhouse

 

Long before ports, like the one that served as the lifeblood for Fernandina Beach for so long, maritime pilots inland or at sea only had fire to guide their way. That’s right, fire. Those responsible for navigating the ships in would build a fire atop a hill, in order to direct sea traffic safely to shore. Eventually, common sense prevailed. They began building platform structures to build the fires on to improve visibility by lighting up a greater height. This is how the modern method came into thought, and the first lighthouses were beginning to be developed. In the beginning, the focus was placed more on the lighthouses serving as an entrance marker to ports, rather than a warning of eminent contact with reefs and other obstacles. It is unclear exactly what methods were used to make the most efficient use of the illuminated towers of old. Since there is very little literature about the operation of the antiquity age of lighthouses, speculation has been the main means of discovery. It is believed that some used combustible liquids in the mix to make the fire last throughout gales and long nights. Another method believed to be effective was the use of mirrors to compound the visibility in low-visibility conditions.

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